carterscarting:

96 Cranes
I read the legend about if you fold 1000 cranes, you are granted a wish. So I started folding them, one per day. I decided to also assign each one with a good memory of each day. So this became a sort of “crane diary”. I made sure each crane could flap ~ before it was glued down ~~

Each crane is smaller than a 1p coin and is made from 3cm x 3cm paper

Beautiful!

Posted on May 18, 2014

Reblogged from: CARTERSCARTING

Notes: 15 notes

Eczema - A Social Stigma?

That’s right. Tackling and busting the hardcore issues one by one. This is a topic I’ve been wanting to get off my chest for a long time. (Turns out it’s easier said than done. And I guess it should be “atopic”…)

Feel free to join me as I delve into the unknown in order to determine whether Everybody’s Favourite Mild Skin Condition is turning people into pariahs. Discovering the extent of the deep psychological impact. Or whether there is any at all.

I’m not making any promises. This lighthearted report into a field I have done no real research on may never come to fruition. I’m simply giving you all a bit of food for thought. Especially as this is an issue close to my heart (metaphorically and otherwise).

I shall begin with a quote. Namely because I have nothing else to do other than to rummage and traipse through books looking for relevant stuff then painstakingly type it out (it sometimes goes by the name of procrastination). 

From Class A (the CHERUB series) by Robert Muchamore:

James sat at an empty desk in the middle. This seriously weird kid sat next to him. He was tall, but stick thin. His uniform was small and his walk was bizarre, like he was trying to move in twenty different directions at once.

Upon first glance this seems like a typical passage from a typical novel aimed at teenagers. So, you may ask, what’s the relevance? Well, my impatient friend, I urge you to read on.

[The “seriously weird kid”] stooped over the desk and began frantically scratching the back of his hand. A snowstorm of skin flakes drifted onto the table in front of him.

'I've got eczema,' Charles explained noisily. 'It gets worse in the summer when I sweat.'

So this eczema sufferer (I’m coining the phrase ‘eczmatics’) is the “class loser”. Great. What hope is there for the rest of us? But don’t worry. I’m not too offended, after all I’ve got pretty thick skin (heh).

Well, if you took the time to peruse this short, rather meaningless piece, rife with bad puns and consisting of simply one example with no actual analysis of anything,  I hope it’s given you lots to think about. Everyone’s desire is to feel comfortable in one’s own skin. Eczmatics, I’m afraid, often don’t have that luxury.

Q: Why did the eczmatic become a dermatologist?

A: Because he knew the subject like the back of his hand.

It’s National Eczema Week this week! Hence the post.

(Author’s Note: This literary masterpiece was written without the intention to offend. The author is keen for the reader to know that she is a confirmed eczmatic and supports National Eczema Week in their efforts to raise awareness. Furthermore, just don’t take any of this seriously. Except the eczema part. Because eczema is always serious. Thanks.)

haha. remember when i used to come on tumblr?

  • Nick Fury: I'd like to know what Loki did to turn two of my best agents into his personal flying monkeys.
  • Thor: ...Monkeys? I don't understand.
  • Captain America: I do!
  • Nick Fury:
  • Stark:
  • Thor:
  • Captain America:
  • Nick Fury:
  • Stark:
  • Thor:
  • Captain America: I understood that reference.
feminismitmakessense:

malibueinstein:

As a lady scientist of color, I have felt like the impostor in the room many many times. Here are two specific things that made me want to switch out of the hard sciences when I was in college.   I want to mention them because I suspect they play a part in the lack-of-women-and-minorities-in-STEM-fields issue:
#1 - Being met with incredulity when I said I didn’t know something in a science class.  Nothing made me doubt my own abilities more than this. I was so shocked by this behavior when I first started taking math and science courses in college that I straight-up stopped asking questions for about two years.  Ask me how much that set me back.
#2 - Asking someone about their class or their research, and they explained it in jargon that was obviously not part of my lexicon.  This always made me feel like I just didn’t have the brains or background necessary to pursue the higher-level science classes that I wanted to.  Also, it’s a dick move.  Also also, there is no slicker way to bore someone, so just don’t do it.  My advisor at Stanford, who was totally brilliant, always argued that it takes a really really smart scientist to communicate science in a way that is understandable to nonscientists.  That guy publishes like it’s his job (disclaimer: it is), so take heed friends!
The real point here is that most girls are less likely to do the
“what, you don’t know…?!?”
thing, or the
“I’m just researching the implications for three dimensional homology jargon and filtration of jargon jargon, it’s pretty simple”
act. So when I first heard people talking like this about classes I was interested in, it was new and scary and made me feel like I was not cut out for science or math.
It wasn’t until many years later that it hit me that everyone has to learn something for the first time at some point, and asking ridiculous questions usually aids and abets this learning process.
However, I’m not one to rant about a problem without proffering a possible solution, so here is my recommendation:
 Gentlemen (and ladies too!) in STEM fields, please, check your rhetorical behaviors, before you wreck the excitement and eagerness of women entering the field.  Additionally, people will like talking to you better if you dispense with the jargon.  I like you better already!  
(also shout-out to jtotheizzoe for posting this comic.  Love yr blog dude.)

Love this take on the xkcd comic. Very interesting to think about.

feminismitmakessense:

malibueinstein:

As a lady scientist of color, I have felt like the impostor in the room many many times. Here are two specific things that made me want to switch out of the hard sciences when I was in college.   I want to mention them because I suspect they play a part in the lack-of-women-and-minorities-in-STEM-fields issue:

#1 - Being met with incredulity when I said I didn’t know something in a science class.  Nothing made me doubt my own abilities more than this. I was so shocked by this behavior when I first started taking math and science courses in college that I straight-up stopped asking questions for about two years.  Ask me how much that set me back.

#2 - Asking someone about their class or their research, and they explained it in jargon that was obviously not part of my lexicon.  This always made me feel like I just didn’t have the brains or background necessary to pursue the higher-level science classes that I wanted to.  Also, it’s a dick move.  Also also, there is no slicker way to bore someone, so just don’t do it.  My advisor at Stanford, who was totally brilliant, always argued that it takes a really really smart scientist to communicate science in a way that is understandable to nonscientists.  That guy publishes like it’s his job (disclaimer: it is), so take heed friends!

The real point here is that most girls are less likely to do the

  • “what, you don’t know…?!?”

thing, or the

  • “I’m just researching the implications for three dimensional homology jargon and filtration of jargon jargon, it’s pretty simple”

act. So when I first heard people talking like this about classes I was interested in, it was new and scary and made me feel like I was not cut out for science or math.

It wasn’t until many years later that it hit me that everyone has to learn something for the first time at some point, and asking ridiculous questions usually aids and abets this learning process.

However, I’m not one to rant about a problem without proffering a possible solution, so here is my recommendation:

 Gentlemen (and ladies too!) in STEM fields, please, check your rhetorical behaviors, before you wreck the excitement and eagerness of women entering the field.  Additionally, people will like talking to you better if you dispense with the jargon.  I like you better already!  

(also shout-out to jtotheizzoe for posting this comic.  Love yr blog dude.)

Love this take on the xkcd comic. Very interesting to think about.

Posted on May 11, 2012

Reblogged from: Sho'Nuff

Source: xkcd.com

Notes: 770 notes

Posted on May 11, 2012

Reblogged from: TheUntalentedOaf

Source: 9gag

Notes: 674 notes

allyspock:

hellotailor:

damnithasook:

hannasedai:

makorralicious:

emilianadarling:

tayloki:

hannahyesss:

This connection has probably already been made by everybody and their dog, but whatever…

obviously Loki needs to go on a quest for his honour or something

OH MY GOD

THIS IS THE BEST THING.

THE. BEST. THING.

Zuko and Loki would have an angst party.

Zuko will take Loki on a life-changing field trip. 

Zuko will take Loki on a life-changing field trip. 

Zuko will take Loki on a life-changing field trip.

Zuko will take Loki on a life-changing field trip. 

fly away in the hot air balloon of self-discovery, loki.

Reblogging so that my friend Charlotte will have something to flail about tonight… yup.

joshishollywood:

I don’t think we take enough time to appreciate the periods in our life when our noses aren’t runny. Is your nose runny right now? No? Think about that. Honestly reflect on it. Enjoy this era of peace. There are dark times on the horizon

danhacker:

Avengers on Parade (RIP Maurice Sendak) | Hannah Friederichs

fyeahsuperheroes:

SCIENCE BROOSSSSSS

Did you hear about the Italian chef that died?

goddammitzak:

castiel-winchesterr:

mrsfigscats:

He pasta way.

we cannoli do so much

his legacy will become a pizza history.

I’m alfredo-f what will happen to his family.

assirrrak:

lmfao me

assirrrak:

lmfao me

Posted on May 11, 2012

Reblogged from: ARENA

Source: secretotaku

Notes: 15,451 notes

gentilenextdoor:

ilovecharts:

Books of the Bible

We saw this one and thought we should submit our version.

-twentyonehundred productions

“Hipster Baby Names” and “Ambiguous Pronunciation”. haha.

Posted on May 11, 2012

Reblogged from: For The Birds

Source: ilovecharts

Notes: 727 notes

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